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October 05, 2011

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David Ehrenstein

Caught the all-media last night. If this is "old school" then I'm playing hookey.

Exceptionally disappointing. For all his obvious smarts and professional skill (top-notch acting, All Tech Credits Pro) at the end of the day it's a flip cynical "inside" (but not all that "inside")story about a lying Democrat who fucks the wrong intern. George may think he's Francesco Rosi but at heart he's Delbert Mann.

Evan Rachel Wood as the intern in question is fine as always. George is George as always. Ryan Gosling had better find a secodn facial expression, fast.

Stolen by Marisa Tomei as Judy Miller.

robhumanick

I is excited. Sentences?

Michael Adams

"George may think he's Francesco Rosi but at heart he's Delbert Mann." The most damning remark ever uttered in these pages. I suspect it's true.

lipranzer

I haven't seen the film yet, but I think Clooney (whom I like as a director as well as actor; I even like his much-maligned LEATHERHEADS) thinks he's Alan J. Pakula, not Rosi.

Stephen Bowie

Delbert Mann is a very underrated director.

Dennis J. O'Connor

Having not seen the film (and I will, as a political junkie)I only wish to comment on the MSN review. It was cleanly written without any of the pretentious literary devices usually reserved for wine tasting and art criticism. George Orwell would have been proud to produce such a work. A rare, readable piece. Thank you.

lipranzer

Having seen the movie, like David, I was a little disappointed. I don't think it's a "flip" movie, but I do think it was capable of, and should have gone, much deeper. I also find it hard to believe a supposedly savvy campaign worker like Gosling's character is supposed to be is so credulous about what Giamatti's character does (Giamatti, Hoffman and Tomei I thought were the best parts of the movie).

Asher

Ehrenstein's right. This was an exceptionally dim movie, marred by a one-note (okay, three notes, but two of them are out of his range) performance from Gosling.

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