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January 23, 2013

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mw

Nice review. I was at the same show and enjoyed it very much. 1919 is far from my favorite record, but it was nice hearing it live. And I really enjoyed the second half and "Captain Hook" was nearly transcendent. I'd seen Cale when he was touring "Sabotage Live" and count that among my favorite shows. I usually hate it when rock people use orchestras but I thought it worked really well at that show. The arrangements were integral, not just a pretension as is usually the case. Took my 13 year-year-old son since he's a big fan of Cale's work in "Songs for Drella". It was his first concert, which reminded me of my first concert, which was when I was thirteen, which was Jethro Tull, where drug dealers openly hawked weed and pills and the stadium was a filled with a giant marijuana cloud. How things have changed, eh. BAM was a bunch of fifty and sixty year olds politely listening to a seventy year old. Still, he enjoyed the show. Turned out his Cello teacher was in the band. Small world, Brooklyn.

If you're interested, here's a great Cale performance from a strange location.

mw

Looks like the link didn't work. Guess I have to do it the ugly way: http://mwebphoto.com/videos/JohnCaleAtJR.mov

Henry Holland

"my first concert, which was when I was thirteen, which was Jethro Tull"

Hopefully it was the "A Passion Play" tour.

mw

Ha, Google tells me that yes, it was the "Passion Play" tour. YouTube confirms my vague memory: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y04QEfSvN4o&feature=player_embedded

Lester Bangs even wrote some positive things about it, though his sentence constructions tended to preclude the positive with phrases modifiers such as "even something so vacuous."

AeC

I was at the Friday show (as well as Wednesday's Nico tribute) too, and thought it was a blast. "Venus in Furs," which I've long thought was a much better fit with Cale's ominious baritone than Reed's nasal drone, was a phenomenal way to wrap things up, although I couldn't help thinking back to seeing Cale at St. Anne's Warehouse about seven years ago when he *opened* with "Venus," then declined to play another Velvets tune for the entire night, which I thought was an enjoyably brazen move. I only wish he'd played "(I Keep a) Close Watch."

Henry Holland

Lucky you! I was born about 3 years too late, my first concerts were in 1975 and I didn't start going to shows regularly until 1978 so I missed Tull on the APP and TAAB tours; ELP on the "Brain Salad Surgery" tour; Yes doing "Tales from Topographic Oceans"; Genesis doing "The Lamb", Pink Floyd doing "Dark Side" with the old stuff. The one consolation: seeing Yes on the "Relayer" tour at the Hollywood Bowl.

Lester Bangs, yikes. I can't decide who's a worse critic from that era, him or Dave Marsh.

Thanks for the Tull link, a pity that a full APP show wasn't professionally filmed (see also: a "Brain Salad Surgery" show and "The Lamb").

check this

It was his first concert, which reminded me of my first concert, which was when I was thirteen, which was Jethro Tull, where drug dealers openly hawked weed and pills and the stadium was a filled with a giant marijuana cloud. How things have changed, eh.

preston

"my first concert, which was when I was thirteen, which was Jethro Tull"

"Hopefully it was the "A Passion Play" tour."


(sniff) wow...

My most treasured hunk of vinyl is a "Passion Play" live bootleg, I have yet to find it on cd. My first Tull show was at 'King's Dominion' near Richmond for the 'Crest of the Knave' tour. Yet another different era...

Thanks!

Krishna H.

Paris 1919 was really awesome! What a splendid performance of John Cale.

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