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October 24, 2012

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Harry K.

Boy, thanks for this. I would have never known. Also, thanks for shaming me into recracking my Henry James.

Jim Gabriel

Noice catch, sir. And Llomheau put a stamp on that scene; wit, severity, a real quality, as they say. looking forward to more.

Zach

I just got out to see this (after having already read this and the other post) and found it to be a masterpiece. I'd been reviewing my Carax a bit in preparation (both Boy Meets Girl and Mauvais Sang are available on YouTube, and not in too poor quality, either) and this is both a reaffirmation of his deepest concerns and a surprisingly, even bewilderingly, spry leap forward. I am very excited to see what he's got next, and I rather ardently hope that all the ebullience over this film keep the momentum strong for another project, and soon.

On a side note - per your initial post, Glenn, you mentioned a Tarkovsky reference as being the first shot of the "movie" that Carax and the audience appear to be watching. As I recall, the first thing we see is the house (where the "banker" version of M. Oscar emerges), and while it is a rather lovely shot, I don't see it as being specific to any Tarkovsky visual. Am I thinking of the right image?

Glenn Kenny

Zach, the shot of the little girl looking out the circular window of the white house struck me as an explicitly "Solaris"-influenced image...

Zach

Ah, now I remember! Didn't strike me at the time, but I see exactly what you mean now. Thanks for clearing that up. I doubt I would've marked the last scene as being in reference to It's a Wonderful Life, but there you go. Not sure that one is as deliberate, but the more I think about it, the more apparent it seems.

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