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February 26, 2012

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Michael Worrall

The sequence in HARD TICKET TO HAWAII where Sidaris incorporates a skateboarder, a blow-up doll, and a bazooka was played endlessly in my friend's apartment during our junior year at college.

Claire K.

I'd love to hear more about this. Shall we adjourn to the hot tub?

Jim Gabriel

HARD TICKET TO THE 375TH ST. Y

Mylife24fps.blogspot.com

Not related to the anecdote, but I was at the Park Avenue Armory for Music in 12 Parts too! Amazing indeed. I can only imagine how demanding this music must be to perform live, what with all the players needing to be on their toes, counting repetitions in their head even as Glass himself bobs his head to signal each new pattern. And they had to do this for five hours (well, close to four without the breaks)! Part of the added tension of seeing it live was just to see whether they could get through it all—which they did, thrillingly so. (That last part is, especially, gloriously bonkers.)

Jaime N. Christley

For the record, it wasn't like "I'm the director and I *order* you to cease that crinkling!" It was indistinguishable from any of the countless shushings I've heard (or tendered) on the New York cinema scene over the years. It was just somewhat badass that it was the director of the actual film that was in front of us at the moment.

bill

So "I'm Looking Through You" would have played instead of Van Morrison's "Everyone?" I am completely unable to see that.

Also, "The big twist is coming up" made me sad.

Glenn Kenny

Yes, but--and this is crucial--the slower, organ-driven version of the song. Having seen it with that music once, I can't hear it any other way.

And yes, the "twist" thing is unsettling, but let us also recall that at this point Mr. Sidaris had another dozxen-plus years of making movies of nubile naked gun-wielding women, so, you know...

Peter Nellhaus

So the question remains: do I spend extra for the wide screen aspect ratio DVDs or get the cheaper Academy ratio set?
http://www.amazon.com/Girls-Guns-G-Strings-Sidaris-Collection/dp/B004HHX9OQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1330355594&sr=1-1

bill

I don't know if I've ever heard that version of "I'm Looking Through You." If I have, I no longer remember it. I still doubt I could imagine it replacing "Everyone," though, having seen the movie a million times, and crying during THAT song, as opposed to the other one.

As for Mr. Sidaris, well, yes, fair enough. But the implication of what his ambitions were, set next to what was actually achieved, tugs at the ol' heartstrings a little bit anyway. Which isn't to say it isn't also funny.

MW

I have the Beatles' ANTHOLOGY 2 set with that early take of "I'm Looking Through You," and the music does fit well, but I think "Everyone" works even better too. FWIW, I do wish the Beatles' own recording of' "Hey Jude" was used as originally hoped...

Frank McDevitt

Some enterprising Hard Ticket fans decided to remake the best scene in the movie, and it's actually quite charming: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKMmz_9Ulq0

bill

I hope that wasn't the big twist, because if it was I'll be reall pissed off.

Frank McDevitt

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