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April 19, 2009

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bill

I have struggled with his fiction -- I've read maybe a half dozen of his books -- but even while doing so I've had to acknowledge that there was and is absolutely no one else like him. If you want to read something Ballard-ian, you pretty much have no choice but to read Ballard. And that is, of course, an exceptionally rare quality in an artist, especially these days.

I feel like I should read something in honor of him in the next few days. Time to pull him out of the library and have a look, I think.

Ed Howard

Wow, that's really sad. I haven't read as much of his fiction as I'd like but *Crash* (both novel and film) is brilliant. Maybe it's time for me to finally dive into that Phoebe Gloeckner-illustrated edition of *The Atrocity Exhibition* that I've had for so long.

c mason wells

Not to mention that he inspired The Normal's great "Warm Leatherette" (and Grace Jones's almost-as-great cover version). He'll be missed.

Dan

This depressed the hell out of me when I heard it: I'd read most of his work and found it brilliant. And I want to see a Olivier Assayas/Jeremy Irons "Super-Cannes", goddamnit.

steve simels

Interviewed him in conjunction with the video release of "Empire of the Sun." Lovely guy, and brilliant, obviously.

DVA118

Bill, I'm surprised you're not a fan, given what I've seen of your tastes on your blog. A great mind and author. Anyone here ever see the film version of "Atrocity Exhibition"? Still want to pick that up at somepoint...

SALO

Ballard, in my opinion, was the greatest British novelist and short story writer of the second half of the 20th century. His brilliance, imagination, humor, and visionary insight will surely be missed.

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